March 21, 2009

No. 20 Loyola Nips No. 16 JMU 10-9

from press release

BALTIMORE - Cara Fillippelli's final goal, on a free-position shot with just under five minutes left, gave No. 20 Loyola a one-goal lead, and the Greyhounds made two big stops on defense in the final two minutes to preserve a 10-9 victory on Saturday afternoon against 16th-ranked James Madison in non-conference action on `Power In Pink Day' at Diane Geppi-Aikens Field.

The effort to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research drew 1,148 fans, many clad in pink attire. Loyola raised over $1,200 that will be donated to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund, named after the late North Carolina State women's basketball coach.

Goalkeeper Kerry Stoothoff made saves on point-blank shots by the Dukes' Kim Griffin and Ashley Kimener with 86 and 29 seconds remaining, respectively, to seal the victory.

Loyola's victory was its second in four days over a ranked opponent, as the Greyhounds defeated No. 14 Cornell, 16-9, on Wednesday.

Filippelli was fouled going to goal and converted her free-position shot from the top of the 8-meter, giving Loyola a 10-9 lead with 4:57 left on the clock. She led Loyola with three goals and had team-highs of three ground balls and four caused turnovers.

Emily Gibson won the ensuing draw control for Loyola, and the Greyhounds (6-1 overall) ran 80 seconds off the clock before James Madison (4-3) regained possession after Dukes goalkeeper Morgan Kelly made a save and Griffin picked up the ground ball.

After a Dukes' timeout, Griffin took a shot from the right side of the cage, but Stoothoff made the save and picked up the loose ball.

Loyola's clearing attempt, however, failed a Jess Brophy forced a Greyhounds' pass out of bounds with a minute left.

Kimener attempted another shot for James Madison with 29 ticks left, but Stoothoff again denied the attempt.

The ball was knocked out to the restraining line where Meg Taylor finally corralled the ground ball, and Loyola ran out the clock.

"We were able to gut out a win on a day that we did not play as particularly well," Loyola Head Coach Jen Adams said. "But, we made a lot of very big plays in moments where we had to. We were determined, and we came through."

James Madison took a 3-1 lead in a low-scoring first half, as Griffin scored unassisted with 3:35 left before the break.

Filippelli, however, pulled the Greyhounds within a goal, scoring on a Mary Clare Taylor assist with 1:43 on the first-half clock.

Abby Rehfuss then tied the game, cutting through the Dukes' defense and scoring unassisted from the left side less than two minutes into the second half.

Grace Gavin took a feed from Rehfuss and scored on a cut to the middle of the crease less than two minutes later, putting Loyola up 4-3.

Jaime Dardine scored one of her two goals, however, for James Madison with just over 25 minutes remaining, knotting the score again.

Meg Taylor and Filippelli scored back-to-back goals in the span of two minutes to five Loyola a 6-4 advantage with 21:54 left.

James Madison came right back, as Caitlin McHugh scored with 19:40 to play, and Kimener tallied another goal just 17 ticks later - both goals coming on Mary Kate Lomady assists - to tie the score at six.

Meg and Mary Clare Taylor scored on back-to-back possessions for the Greyhounds, giving them another two-goal advantage, 8-6, with 16:05 remaining.

Susan Lines scored 20 seconds later for James Madison, and after a five-plus lull in scoring, Kimener evened the game at eight each with a goal off a Monica Zabel pass with 9:28 left.

Gavin won the ensuing draw control for Loyola, and she took a feed from Emily Gibson 22 seconds later to give Loyola a one-goal lead, 9-8.

Kimener, however, came back for James Madison to tie the game at 9-all with an unassisted goal at the 8:09 mark.

In addition to Filippelli's three goals, Gavin and Meg Taylor each scored twice for Loyola. Gavin and Gibson both had two assists. Kimener had three goals and an assist for the Dukes.

Stoothoff played the second half in goal for Loyola, making five saves, while Meg Steffe had one in the first.


comments powered by Disqus