February 20, 2016
Loyola won its third straight contest over Johns Hopkins - the first time the Greyhounds have done so in program history against their Baltimore neighbor and longtime rival. (John Strohsacker)
Loyola won its third straight contest over Johns Hopkins - the first time the Greyhounds have done so in program history against their Baltimore neighbor and longtime rival. (John Strohsacker)

Loyola Hangs On to Nip Neighbor Johns Hopkins

by Gary Lambrecht | LaxMagazine.com | Twitter | Lambrecht Archive

Loyola midfielder Jeff Chase, a graduate student who has missed two seasons with knee injuries during his time with the Greyhounds, made his veteran presence felt on the field Saturday at Ridley Athletic Complex. And in the wake of no. 11 Loyola's 9-8 victory over no. 6 Johns Hopkins, Chase did not underplay the significance of the win over the Greyhounds' local rivals.

Chase led a fine showing by Loyola's second midfield unit with two goals. Senior attackman Zach Herreweyers scored three goals for his 15th career hat trick, and the Greyhounds overcame a 16-save effort by Hopkins goalie Brock Turnbaugh.

And it was only after the 10th and final save by Loyola sophomore goalie Grant Limone – he smothered a 15-yard shot from dead center by Pat Fraser with 52 seconds left – that Loyola could relax and enjoy the history it had just made.

"That was a win that probably eluded us last year. We made plays when we needed to make plays. Our second midfield was terrific. And when we needed him the most, Grant Limone bailed us out."

-Loyola head coach Charlie Toomey

For the time in the 53-game series history between these schools located a mile apart on Charles Street, Loyola (2-0) has beaten Hopkins (1-1) three consecutive times. The Blue Jays still lead the series, 47-6.

"It's a big game for us," said Chase, who scored two of the second midfield's three goals, with sophomore Johnny Giuffreda getting the other. "I think [the series] used to be called 'The Slaughter on Charles Street.' It's not that anymore. It has a legitimate competitiveness to it. For us, especially the seniors, this means the world to us."

Before 4,868 spectators on a balmy day, the Greyhounds had a frustrating afternoon as shooters by converting nine of 45 attempts (20 percent). But Loyola was the more poised and balanced team in a contest that the younger Blue Jays never led.

To Hopkins' credit, despite making only eight of 38 shots, it closed to within one goal of the Greyhounds four times after trailing at halftime, 5-2.

Loyola's defense did a stellar job containing Hopkins star attackman Ryan Brown. He scored the Blue Jays' first two goals and went scoreless the rest of the way. Brown found the going tough after Loyola made a switch and put sophomore defenseman Foster Huggins on him.

Junior midfielder John Crawley and freshman attackman Kyle Marr each finished with two goals, but the Blue Jays could not find much rhythm on offense, especially throughout a sloppy first half that featured 10 of Hopkins' 16 turnovers.

Brown committed the last Hopkins turnover with 3:47 left and Loyola hanging on to its 9-8 edge. Marr drove down the right alley toward the Greyhounds goal then sent a pass across the Loyola defense to Brown, who was positioned for an open, 15-yard shot on the left wing. But Brown failed to handle the pass and lost the ball.

"I should have caught that and shot it, but I didn't," Brown said. "[Huggins] did a really good job on me. He stayed on my hip pocket."

Loyola, which also got a goal and three assists from freshman attackman Pat Spencer and one goal apiece from starting midfielders Brian Sherlock and Tyler Albrecht, showed its depth in other areas.

Loyola senior attackman Zach Herreweyers scored three goals for his 15th career hat trick, helping the Greyhounds win a third straight over their neighbor and rival. (John Strohsacker)

On a day when faceoff specialist Graham Savio won just one of nine draws, sophomore Mike Orefice shined by winning seven of 12 against Craig Madarasz (13-for-21).

"That was a win that probably eluded us last year," said Loyola coach Charley Toomey, referring to Loyola's 7-8 finish a year ago. "We made plays when we needed to make plays. Our second midfield was terrific. And when we needed him the most, Grant Limone bailed us out."

"I don't think we put forward our best foot, certainly not in the first half. We played way too much defense," Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said. "We had to play a tough brand of lacrosse [to win]. I don't think we did that in the first half. We wasted a good effort from our goalie and our faceoff man."

Hopkins gave away so many possessions in the early going that Loyola piled up 18 shots in the first quarter and 29 attempts in the first half. Turnbaugh turned away 10 shots in the first half, when Spencer's goal and two assists sparked the Loyola offense.

Hopkins found some offensive groove quickly after the break, as attackman Wilkins Dismuke and Crawley scored goals within a span of 2:24 to cut the Loyola lead to 5-4 with 11:25 left in the third quarter. But the Blue Jays never pulled even with the Greyhounds.

Herreweyers took a perfect feed on the crease from Spencer and gave Loyola a 6-4 cushion with 8:40 left in the quarter. After Marr scored in close with an assist from Brown, Chase scored his second goal to put the Greyhounds back in front, 7-5 with 3:19 left in the period.

Then, after Fraser scored with 12.8 seconds left in the third, Loyola answered with a two-goal run early in the fourth quarter that proved to be decisive. Herreweyers picked up a loose ball on top of the crease and scored with 14:16 to go to make it 8-6. With 12:58 left, Sherlock sent a low-to-high, eight-yard beauty past Turnbaugh to make it 9-6.

That was it for Loyola's scoring, but Limone and the defense dug in to preserve the win. Limone made a sparkling kick save to stop Brown's five-yarder at the 12-minute mark. But the Blue Jays kept coming.

Marr, with the help of Shack Stanwick's third assist, scored an extra-man goal with 11:19 left to make it 9-7. Crawley then scored an unassisted goal with 8:43 remaining to pull Hopkins to within one goal for the fourth time in the half.

Loyola turned the ball over with 1:55 left, following a stall warning. Ultimately, Limone had to step up to make the final play. He stopped the high shot he anticipated from Fraser.

"[Fraser] has got a great shot. I knew he would get his looks today," Limone said. "I had to stay big [in the cage]. That was one I needed to save."


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